Filter Keyword to...

Category: Child, Family, and School Social Worker

Results Per Page :
This module defines and discusses what “therapeutic” in the therapeutic relationship means.
This module defines and discusses what “therapeutic” in the therapeutic relationship means.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
Nelson has studied forms of crying and crying situations, from children to adults, client to therapist, in-session and out-of-session.
Nelson has studied forms of crying and crying situations, from children to adults, client to therapist, in-session and out-of-session.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
This module addresses cultural differences and cultural competencies and related issues that affect the therapeutic relationship.
This module addresses cultural differences and cultural competencies and related issues that affect the therapeutic relationship.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
This module addresses the subject of the impact of the economy on the therapeutic relationship.
This module addresses the subject of the impact of the economy on the therapeutic relationship.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
This program focuses on the decision to reduce the fee or the number of sessions for the patient in therapy.
This program focuses on the decision to reduce the fee or the number of sessions for the patient in therapy.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
This module addresses the clinical possibilities of the concept of connectedness.
This module addresses the clinical possibilities of the concept of connectedness.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
Description of the use of self-psychology and how it has been influenced by what you’ve been learning from neuroscience and infant research
Description of the use of self-psychology and how it has been influenced by what you’ve been learning from neuroscience and infant research
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
This module discusses the baseline performance and the engagement in more “deliberate practice” to improve caregivers work including the willingness to engage.
This module discusses the baseline performance and the engagement in more “deliberate practice” to improve caregivers work including the willingness to engage.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
The purpose of this module is to address how clinicians can end therapy responsibly, even when conditions are challenging.
The purpose of this module is to address how clinicians can end therapy responsibly, even when conditions are challenging.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
Parental mental illness is one of the most challenging presenting problems to address in the child welfare field. There are specific risks associated with children who live in homes where parents are...
[READ MORE]
Parental mental illness is one of the most challenging presenting problems to address in the child welfare field. There are specific risks associated with children who live in homes where parents are diagnosed with a mental illness or display symptoms of a mental illness. Children of parents with mental illness experience an increased risk of developmental problems, behavioral problems and emotional problems. Because of poor treatment outcomes and ineffective mental health treatment programs, a significant number of parents with mental illness who are involved with the child welfare system fail to be reunited with their children. Of greater concern than high numbers of failed reunification are the poor outcomes found in foster children who live with parents with mental illness. Creating effective treatment plans for parental mental illness is necessary to identify effective programs and increase collaboration between mental health and child welfare professionals to improve reunification. This course discusses the importance of creating a treatment plan for parental mental illness for families involved in the child welfare systems and takes a detailed look at how mental illness impacts parenting and how to address barriers to creating an effective approach to treatment and reunification.
Parental mental illness is one of the most challenging presenting problems to address in the child welfare field. There are specific risks associated with children who live in homes where parents are diagnosed with a mental illness or display symptoms of a mental illness. Children of parents with mental illness experience an increased risk of developmental problems, behavioral problems and emotional problems. Because of poor treatment outcomes and ineffective mental health treatment programs, a significant number of parents with mental illness who are involved with the child welfare system fail to be reunited with their children. Of greater concern than high numbers of failed reunification are the poor outcomes found in foster children who live with parents with mental illness. Creating effective treatment plans for parental mental illness is necessary to identify effective programs and increase collaboration between mental health and child welfare professionals to improve reunification. This course discusses the importance of creating a treatment plan for parental mental illness for families involved in the child welfare systems and takes a detailed look at how mental illness impacts parenting and how to address barriers to creating an effective approach to treatment and reunification.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: Ed4Online
An estimated 60% to 80% of families known to the child welfare systems have substance abuse problems, with parental substance abuse one of the most difficult presenting problems to treat successfully....
[READ MORE]
An estimated 60% to 80% of families known to the child welfare systems have substance abuse problems, with parental substance abuse one of the most difficult presenting problems to treat successfully. Parental substance abuse is associated with higher rates of continued abuse, greater likelihood of out-of-home placement, longer stays in care, and higher rates of termination of parental rights and adoption. In addition, parental substance abuse has high rates of relapse, which presents a challenge due to time limits for family reunification. Successful treatment for parental substance abuse requires a supportive approach with an emphasis on collaboration. This course looks at the challenges of parental substance abuse before discussing how to approach the treatment plan. The importance of documentation and collaboration with substance abuse systems is also discussed.
An estimated 60% to 80% of families known to the child welfare systems have substance abuse problems, with parental substance abuse one of the most difficult presenting problems to treat successfully. Parental substance abuse is associated with higher rates of continued abuse, greater likelihood of out-of-home placement, longer stays in care, and higher rates of termination of parental rights and adoption. In addition, parental substance abuse has high rates of relapse, which presents a challenge due to time limits for family reunification. Successful treatment for parental substance abuse requires a supportive approach with an emphasis on collaboration. This course looks at the challenges of parental substance abuse before discussing how to approach the treatment plan. The importance of documentation and collaboration with substance abuse systems is also discussed.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: Ed4Online
Children in foster care are more likely to experience adverse childhood experiences, which increases their risk of negative outcomes in childhood and into adulthood. Many of the adverse experiences are highly...
[READ MORE]
Children in foster care are more likely to experience adverse childhood experiences, which increases their risk of negative outcomes in childhood and into adulthood. Many of the adverse experiences are highly traumatic and ultimately result in foster care placement. Because trauma is known to result in increased stress, children unable to adapt to the stress will find it more challenging to recover from the traumatic experiences. Challenges of unaddressed trauma in childhood can range from behavioral outbursts to negative impacts in functioning at home and school. As adults, they may continue to experience the negative impact in their relationships and struggle with mental and physical illness. This course explores unaddressed trauma often seen in children in foster care settings and will look at the effects of this unaddressed trauma on children and adolescents. This course will also explore the best treatment approaches to address symptoms related to trauma in youth.
Children in foster care are more likely to experience adverse childhood experiences, which increases their risk of negative outcomes in childhood and into adulthood. Many of the adverse experiences are highly traumatic and ultimately result in foster care placement. Because trauma is known to result in increased stress, children unable to adapt to the stress will find it more challenging to recover from the traumatic experiences. Challenges of unaddressed trauma in childhood can range from behavioral outbursts to negative impacts in functioning at home and school. As adults, they may continue to experience the negative impact in their relationships and struggle with mental and physical illness. This course explores unaddressed trauma often seen in children in foster care settings and will look at the effects of this unaddressed trauma on children and adolescents. This course will also explore the best treatment approaches to address symptoms related to trauma in youth.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: Ed4Online
Individuals have many reasons they initially decide to become foster parents. They may or may not possess many of the needed skills for addressing common behaviors seen in foster children. Both understanding...
[READ MORE]
Individuals have many reasons they initially decide to become foster parents. They may or may not possess many of the needed skills for addressing common behaviors seen in foster children. Both understanding and appropriately responding to the range of challenging behaviors due to the child’s familial history as well as mental illness is critical for successful foster care placement. This overview of understanding common behaviors in foster children will discuss some of the most common acting out behaviors in foster children, as well as the appropriate responses to address these behaviors.
Individuals have many reasons they initially decide to become foster parents. They may or may not possess many of the needed skills for addressing common behaviors seen in foster children. Both understanding and appropriately responding to the range of challenging behaviors due to the child’s familial history as well as mental illness is critical for successful foster care placement. This overview of understanding common behaviors in foster children will discuss some of the most common acting out behaviors in foster children, as well as the appropriate responses to address these behaviors.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: Ed4Online
Developmental disorders are characterized as mental or physical impairments which begin before the age of 22 and last throughout a persons' lifetime. These impairments are called developmental disorders...
[READ MORE]
Developmental disorders are characterized as mental or physical impairments which begin before the age of 22 and last throughout a persons' lifetime. These impairments are called developmental disorders because they are most often identified in children who are around 3 years old, a critical time in child development. Developmental disorders are severe chronic conditions due to mental and/or physical impairments. Problems with language, mobility, learning, and self-care are all associated with developmental disorders. This course will teach current and future Direct Support Professionals about developmental disorders so they can better support clients, patients, and residents. This course is designed for entry-level Direct Support Professionals.
Developmental disorders are characterized as mental or physical impairments which begin before the age of 22 and last throughout a persons' lifetime. These impairments are called developmental disorders because they are most often identified in children who are around 3 years old, a critical time in child development. Developmental disorders are severe chronic conditions due to mental and/or physical impairments. Problems with language, mobility, learning, and self-care are all associated with developmental disorders. This course will teach current and future Direct Support Professionals about developmental disorders so they can better support clients, patients, and residents. This course is designed for entry-level Direct Support Professionals.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: Ed4Online
Now, the developers of the DSM-V have recognized that while most people have grief reactions within a typical range, 10 to 15 percent of grievers have severe reactions to the loss of a loved one and thus may...
[READ MORE]
Now, the developers of the DSM-V have recognized that while most people have grief reactions within a typical range, 10 to 15 percent of grievers have severe reactions to the loss of a loved one and thus may need treatment that includes prescription medication and therapy. So now, a person who is grieving a loss potentially may be diagnosed with depression or an adjustment disorder. Since the profound sadness that stems from grief can look a lot like the sadness depression brings, and since this similarity can create a dilemma for mental health professionals, the bereavement exclusion from these diagnoses has become highly controversial.
Now, the developers of the DSM-V have recognized that while most people have grief reactions within a typical range, 10 to 15 percent of grievers have severe reactions to the loss of a loved one and thus may need treatment that includes prescription medication and therapy. So now, a person who is grieving a loss potentially may be diagnosed with depression or an adjustment disorder. Since the profound sadness that stems from grief can look a lot like the sadness depression brings, and since this similarity can create a dilemma for mental health professionals, the bereavement exclusion from these diagnoses has become highly controversial.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
When it comes to eating disorders, new knowledge has generated the single biggest change in the DSM-V: a move away from categorizing eating disorders by age, to a united system of feeding and eating...
[READ MORE]
When it comes to eating disorders, new knowledge has generated the single biggest change in the DSM-V: a move away from categorizing eating disorders by age, to a united system of feeding and eating disorders. By combining the symptomatology, it is more possible to study the links, avoiding the generational disconnects.
When it comes to eating disorders, new knowledge has generated the single biggest change in the DSM-V: a move away from categorizing eating disorders by age, to a united system of feeding and eating disorders. By combining the symptomatology, it is more possible to study the links, avoiding the generational disconnects.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
Prior to the DSM-V, personality disorders were coded on Axis II. But now the DSM-V has done away with the use of “axes” for diagnostic coding, and the good news is there is a new conceptualization of...
[READ MORE]
Prior to the DSM-V, personality disorders were coded on Axis II. But now the DSM-V has done away with the use of “axes” for diagnostic coding, and the good news is there is a new conceptualization of personality disorders away from undesirable or negative personality features and towards a conceptualization of personality disorder as an impairment in both self-organization and interpersonal relating.
Prior to the DSM-V, personality disorders were coded on Axis II. But now the DSM-V has done away with the use of “axes” for diagnostic coding, and the good news is there is a new conceptualization of personality disorders away from undesirable or negative personality features and towards a conceptualization of personality disorder as an impairment in both self-organization and interpersonal relating.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
The DSM-V includes a new developmental subtype of PTSD called “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Preschool Children.” This represents a significant step for the DSM taxonomy, and I am happy to be able to...
[READ MORE]
The DSM-V includes a new developmental subtype of PTSD called “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Preschool Children.” This represents a significant step for the DSM taxonomy, and I am happy to be able to report that the general consensus is that the APA got something right. The sense is that regarding the entire PTSD category, the DSM-V closes a lot of loopholes in the diagnosis, without cutting out legitimate trauma sufferers, while being expanded to now cover the subtype of Pre-school children age six and younger.
The DSM-V includes a new developmental subtype of PTSD called “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Preschool Children.” This represents a significant step for the DSM taxonomy, and I am happy to be able to report that the general consensus is that the APA got something right. The sense is that regarding the entire PTSD category, the DSM-V closes a lot of loopholes in the diagnosis, without cutting out legitimate trauma sufferers, while being expanded to now cover the subtype of Pre-school children age six and younger.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
An overview, highlighting the most significant changes and differences between the DSM-V and the DSM IV-TR, the manual it replaces.
An overview, highlighting the most significant changes and differences between the DSM-V and the DSM IV-TR, the manual it replaces.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: VeReality
Water activities can be fun: swimming, boating, skiing, or just playing. However, it can also be dangerous. Anyone responsible for the care of children is aware of the many safety needs that exist in a...
[READ MORE]
Water activities can be fun: swimming, boating, skiing, or just playing. However, it can also be dangerous. Anyone responsible for the care of children is aware of the many safety needs that exist in a variety of settings. Water safety is one of the most important safety topics, as a lack of attention to safety can mean serious injury and even death. Although it is often overlooked, pools, spas, and other bodies of water all pose a serious safety risk to children of all ages. Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death for children under five according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. It is estimated that nationwide, 350 children under the age of five drown in swimming pools every year, with the majority of the deaths occurring in June, July and August and happening in backyard swimming pools. This course will discuss some general safety recommendations to prevent accidental drowning as well as the specific safety requirements for having pools in homes with young children. Also included is a review of the best approaches to pool safety and how to minimize risk of harm for children and adolescents.
Water activities can be fun: swimming, boating, skiing, or just playing. However, it can also be dangerous. Anyone responsible for the care of children is aware of the many safety needs that exist in a variety of settings. Water safety is one of the most important safety topics, as a lack of attention to safety can mean serious injury and even death. Although it is often overlooked, pools, spas, and other bodies of water all pose a serious safety risk to children of all ages. Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death for children under five according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. It is estimated that nationwide, 350 children under the age of five drown in swimming pools every year, with the majority of the deaths occurring in June, July and August and happening in backyard swimming pools. This course will discuss some general safety recommendations to prevent accidental drowning as well as the specific safety requirements for having pools in homes with young children. Also included is a review of the best approaches to pool safety and how to minimize risk of harm for children and adolescents.
[READ LESS]
Produced by: Ed4Online